The Auditory Lab

at Carnegie Mellon University

 

THE SOUND EVENTS DATABASE

       


The Sound Events Database is a unique collection of recordings of sounds that were made for research purposes. A variety of objects underwent various impacts, scrapes, rolls, and deformations; liquids were dripped, poured, sloshed and splashed. Every type of sound event includes five exemplars, and each exemplar lasts for several seconds (when possible). All repetitive events were repeated at a steady 2 cycles per second. The recording conditions were similar for all sounds, yielding virtually no differences in background noise or spectral shaping. None of the sounds are clipped and all were recorded with high-quality equipment with a flat frequency response inside of a sound-attenuating chamber treated with acoustic foam wedges (equipment specifications available). Details about all of the recording conditions are documented in the downloads, including videos that show how the actual objects were handled. See the "sound events downloads" tab to download sounds from the NSF-funded Sound Events Database. Recordings of sound events can be downloaded individually or in groups, notes and videos detailing the recording procedure can also be downloaded separately or in a single package with all sounds from the database.

All content available on this site is provided under the terms defined in the LEGAL NOTICE.

 
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by admin — Copyright 2016, Laurie Heller, Ph.D. Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this material for any purpose other than its incorporation into a commercial product or transfer for compensation is hereby granted without fee, provided that the above copyright notice appears in all copies, that Dr. Laurie Heller of Carnegie Mellon University and the support of NSF grant 0446955 are acknowledged in all publications and documents as the source of the material, and that the name of Dr. Laurie Heller not be used in endorsing any product resulting from the use of the material without specific, written prior permission.