Dr. Cohen's Scales:
We welcome copies (e-mail is OK) of any in press or published papers using any of Dr. Cohen's scales that you are willing to share with us, and thank you in advance for your generosity. They will not be redistributed or linked without your permission.

Permissions:  Permission for use of scales is not necessary when use is for nonprofit academic research or nonprofit educational purposes. For other uses, please contact Ellen Conser at conser@andrew.cmu.edu for instructions.


                PERCEIVED STRESS SCALE (PSS)
                         


PLEASE NOTE: The Perceived Stress Scale is not a diagnostic instrument; there are no score cut-offs. There are only comparisons within your own sample. For normative data from large US samples, see articles at right.

NOTE about extending the recall period: We have not collected psychometrics on other time periods.  Our guess is that the longer the retrospective period becomes, the less accurate the measure will be.  Shorter time periods (e.g., daily intervals) should not be a problem.

PSS (English; 10 Item; html version)
Word (.doc) version
Self-fillable, scorable online version of the PSS 10 (Used with permission by Dr. Fern Stockdale Winder) Please note: scoring is not updated with 2009 normative US data.
Reliability and validity information for the PSS-10 can be found in papers (1) and (3), at right.

PSS (English; 4 Item; html version)
Word (.doc) version
The 4-item version was validated. See the JHSB article (at right)

PSS (English; 14 Item; html version)
Word (.doc) version


PSS Scoring

Additional scoring and other information

PSS on Wikipedia

PSS: FREQUENTLY- ASKED QUESTIONS (.doc; updated Feb. 17, 2014)
The FAQ includes a list of currently available translations

Brief Introduction to Measures of Psychological Stress

REFERENCES to studies that examine the relationship between the Perceived Stress Scale and Biological or Verified Disease Outcomes (source: MacArthur Research Network on SES & Health). NOTE: This is not a comprehensive list.




                                    PSS TRANSLATIONS

How to Acquire Permissions for Translations:
To acquire permission to use a translation in your project, please attempt to contact its translator directly: Non-English translations are the sole intellectual property of the translator, and permissions requests should be sent to them, not Dr. Cohen. If you are unsuccessful at contacting a translator, please cite their name and this website's URL in your publications. Thank you.

Spanish PSS (10 Item)
(European Spanish; Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.)

Spanish PSS (14 Item)
Updated version (2013)
Translation into European Spanish by Eduardo Remor,
eduardo.remor@uam.es, and colleagues. Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory. For psychometrics, LINK to Drs. Remor's (2006) paper, "Psychometric Properties of a European Spanish Version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)." (Thanks to Dr. Remor for granting us permission to post his work on our site.)
For more information about Dr. Remor's research:
www.uam.es/psico&salud

www.iberohemofilia.net

Portuguese PSS (Journal Article about the 10 Item scale)
Scale Only

We would like to thank Drs. Miguel Trigo, Noélia Canudo, Danilo Silva and Fernando Branco for this translation. This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory. Dr. Trigo may be emailed with questions at miguel.trigo70@gmail.com

Mexican Spanish PSS (10 Item)
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Mex. Spanish PSS (10 Item)
(another version)
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties. Translation by (and thanks to) Ms. Carolina Oliva & Ms. Janet Nieves. Thanks also to Ms. Hilary Colbert (hilaryd@prodigy.net) for sending us the translation. All 3 women are with the Camden [NJ] Healthy Start Project


Mex. Spanish PSS (10 Item)
(another version)
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties. Thanks to Céline Perriolat of the MAPI Research Institute (cperriolat@mapi.fr) for sending us the translation.

Mex. Spanish PSS (14 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Drs. Mónica Teresa González Ramírez and Rene Landero Hernandez. Their 2007 article contains psychometric information. Their 2008 article used the translation to study an explanatory model of stress and psychosomatic symptoms. Dra. González Ramírez may be contacted at: monygzz77@yahoo.com
Her website is http://www.monica-gonzalez.com/


South American (Chile) Spanish PSS (14 Item)
Translation by, and thanks to, Dr. Carlos Cruz Marin and colleagues. Their 2008 article (go to pages 116-117) provides validity and other data about the translation and its use with a sample of 117 adult students. Dr. Cruz Marin may be contacted at carloscruzmar@hotmail.com
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.
More information about Chilean Spanish translations:
Another version of the PSS-14 (South American [Chilean] Spanish)....SEE ALSO:
Article with validity and other data about Erik Marin's translation of the Chilean Spanish PSS-14;
Article with reliability data
about Erik Marin's translation of the Chilean Spanish PSS-14;
Both articles collected data from 584 adults in the Santiago metropolitan area, and are courtesy of Dr. Erik Marin of the Universidad Santo Tomas. Reach him via email at erikmarincuevas@gmail.com

Spanish PSS (10 Item; translator from Puerto Rico)
Thanks to Dr. María del C. Fernández Rodríguez, who may be contacted at mfernandez@cayey.upr.edu
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Danish PSS (10 Item)
This is a consensus Danish translation, created by a collaboration of researchers: Drs. Anders Joergensen, Robert Zachariae, Lis Raabaek Olsen, Anita Eskildsen, Kent Nielsen, David Christiansen and Johan Hviid Andersen. We thank the collaborators for their efforts. Inquiries may be directed to Dr. Eskildsen at animorte@rm.dk
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Norwegian PSS (10 Item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) CheckWare AS, Norway.  This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties. Correspondence may be directed to: support@checkware.com

Norwegian PSS (14 Item)
Thank you to Hanne Alfheim, Oslo University Hospital – Ullevål, Norway, and colleagues for sharing this translation with us. Hanne may be emailed at halfheim@ous-hf.no
The translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Swedish PSS (14 Item)
We thank Dr. Ingibjörg Jonsdottir and the translators for sharing this translation. The translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties. For more information contact Dr. Jonsdottir at ingibjorg.jonsdottir@vgregion.se or visit the Institutet för Stressmedicin website, http://www.vgregion.se/stressmedicin

To obtain another version of the Swedish PSS-14, see its source article: Eskin M, Parr D (1996). Introducing a Swedish version of an instrument measuring mental stress. Reports from the Department of Psychology, the University of Stockholm [Sweden], no. 813. Or you may request it from the translator by visiting Dr. Eskin's website.

Hebrew PSS (10 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Oren Lahak, Meir General Hospital, Kfar Saba, Israel (e-mail: Olahak@012.net.il).  This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Greek PSS (14 item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Eleni Andreou, who may be contacted at eandeou@gmail.com
The scale was administered to 941 healthy Greek adults, and was culturally adapted during pre-testing. Cronbach alpha was estimated at 0.79, which was interpreted as good internal consistency. Based on Pearson correlation analysis, PSS strongly correlated with the subscales of DSS 21 for stress (0,644), depression (0,606), and anxiety (0,542), while the correlation was moderate with the scale of physical stress symptoms.

Greek PSS (14 it
em; another version)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Drs. Alexia Katsarou and Demosthenes Panagiotakos, of (respectively) University of Thessaly and Harokopio University, Greece. Dr. Katsarou may be contacted at katsaroualexia@gmail.com
The scale was administered to 100 employed Greek adults. Very good internal consistency was confirmed for the overall sample (Cronbach alpha = 0.84).

Greek PSS (10 item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Marios Adonis, University of Nicosia, Cyprus. Dr. Adonis may be reached at adonis.m@unic.ac.cy
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

Italian PSS (10 item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Andrea Fossati, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University of Milano, who may be contacted at fossati.andrea@hsr.it
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

German PSS (10 item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Univ.-Prof. Dr. med. Arndt Büssing, Universität Witten/Herdecke, Germany, who may be contacted at Arndt.Buessing@uni-wh.de
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

German PSS (4 item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Jan Engling, GfK SE, Nuremberg, Germany, who may be contacted at jan.engling@gfk.com
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.


German PSS (4 item [Another version])
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Dr. Eva Schwarz, Marketing Heel Deutschland;
e-mail: eva.schwarz@heel.de, Germany
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.


                                         PAPERS ON PSS

(1.) Cohen, S., & Janicki-Deverts, D. (2012). Who's stressed? Distributions of psychological stress in the United States in probability samples from 1983, 2006 and 2009.  Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 42, 1320-1334.  This article provides NORMATIVE DATA for the PSS-10 from large 2006 and 2009 probability samples of the U.S.   


(2.) Cohen, S., Kamarck, T., & Mermelstein, R. (1983). A global measure of perceived stress. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 24, 385-396.
(provides RELIABILITY and VALIDITY)

(3.) Cohen, S., & Williamson, G. (1988). Perceived stress in a probability sample of the U.S. In S. Spacapam & S. Oskamp (Eds.), The social psychology of health: Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
(provides NORMATIVE DATA for the PSS-4, PSS-10, and PSS-14 from a large U.S. sample polled in 1983)


(4.) Warttig, S. L., Forshaw, M. J., South, J., & White, A. K. (2013). New, normative, English-sample data for the Short Form Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4). Journal of Health Psychology, 18, 1617-1628. (provides NORMATIVE DATA for the PSS-4 (short form PSS) from a large British sample polled in 2009)



                                    PSS TRANSLATIONS

How to Acquire Permissions for Translations:
To acquire permission to use a translation in your project, please attempt to contact its translator directly: Non-English translations are the sole intellectual property of the translator, and permissions requests should be sent to them, not Dr. Cohen. If you are unsuccessful at contacting a translator, please cite their name and this website's URL in your publications. Thank you.

French PSS (14 Item):
          French PSS (14 Item),  'General Population'
          French PSS (14 Item),  'At Work'
Translations have not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of their psychometric properties.  Translation by - and thanks to - Dr. Jean-Pierre Rolland, Professor Emeritus, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense.  Dr. Rolland may be emailed at jean-pierre.rolland@u-paris10.fr

Bulgarian PSS (14 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Vihra Naydenova, University of Bielefeld, Germany. Vihra's study of 709 Bulgarian college students showed very good reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.80). For further information, contact Vihra at vihranaydenova@yahoo.com This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

Hungarian PSS (14 Item; 10 Item; 4 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Barna Konkoly Thege and Adrienne Stauder of the Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Semmelweis University Budapest, Hungary. For validity information, click here. For the abstract of the journal article in which the translation appears, click here.
Dr. Konkoly Thege may be emailed with questions at
konkoly.thege.barna@gmail.com

Serbian PSS (10 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to)
Dr. Veljko Jovanović, University of Novi Sad, Serbia. This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory. Dr. Jovanović may be emailed with questions at vejo@uns.ac.rs

Korean PSS (14 Item; 10 Item; 4 Item)

Translations by (and our thanks go out to) Dr. Eun-Hyun Lee, Ajou University, South Korea, who may be emailed with questions at ehlee@ajou.ac.kr
Dr. Lee is currently performing a validation study on the translations with Korean patients with chronic disease, and has agreed to share those results with us when completed.

Korean PSS (10 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Juno Park, Doctural Student in the Counseling Psychology Program, Ball State University. This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory. Juno Park may be emailed with questions at shinjizzang@hotmail.com

Korean PSS (10 Item; another version)
We would like to thank Dr. Gwi-Ryung Son Hong of Hanyang University, South Korea, for this translation. Dr. Gwi-Ryung Son Hong may be contacted to request factor analysis data and other information about the translation at grson@hanyang.ac.kr
The translation was tested on 552 adults and elderly, and demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties.

KOREAN PSS -- For additional information, see: Park, J. N. & Seo, Y. S. (2010). Validation of the Perceived Stress Scale on samples of Korean university students. Korean Journal of Psychology: General, 29(3). 611-629.

Chinese PSS (14 Item)
(Traditional Chinese)  Translation by (and thanks to) Professor Li-Chuan Chu, Dept. of Health Services Administration, Chung-Shan Medical University. Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; its psychometric properties are available in the reference cited in the scale.

Taiwanese Chinese PSS (10 Item)
(Traditional Chinese)  Translation by and thanks to Dr. I-Fen Lin. Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties. For additional information, contact Dr. Dana Glei at danaglei@sonic.net or http://danaglei.users.sonic.net

Chinese PSS (10 Item) pdf file   MS Word file (Simplified Chinese) 
Article with this translation's psychometrics in a sample of adult Chinese policewomen
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory. Thanks to Dr. Zhen Wang, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, P.R. China, who is glad to receive any questions at this email: wangzhen@smhc.org.cn

Thai PSS (14 Item)
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Thai PSS (10 Item)
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory. Some psychometric data are available (click link). Translation by (and thanks to) Ms. Chalalai Dongpachit. E-mail her at:
chalalaid@hotmail.com
LINK to Ms. Dongpachit's dissertation abstract (Word file)

Thai PSS (10 Item, another translation)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Nahathai Wongpakaran, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. E-mail: nkuntawo@med.cmu.ac.th
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

Malayalam PSS (10 Item)
Thank you to Dr. Anisha Janardhanan, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India for sharing this translation with our lab. Dr. Janardhanan may be emailed at anisha_janardhanan@yahoo.com
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Tamil PSS (10 Item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Mr. Santhalingam Sathees, University of Jaffna, Sri Lanka; email: crazyken1984@gmail.com   This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Sinhala PSS (10 Item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) A.V.S. Rekha Aththidiye, Licensed Clinical Psychologist, University of Columbo; Sri Lanka.  This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.
Correspondence may be directed to: rekha.aththidiye@gmail.com

Polish PSS (14 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Rafael Mikolajczyk, University of Bielefeld, Germany. The scale was used in a study of 591 Polish university students and showed very good reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.81). For further information, contact Dr. Mikolajczyk at rmikolajczyk@uni-bielefeld.de
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

Polish PSS (10 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Zygfryd Juczynski and Nina Oginska-Bulik. Thanks also to Joanna Stanczak, Psychological Test Laboratory / Pracownia Testow Psychologicznych. For further information, contact Ms. Stanczak at pracownia@practest.com.pl
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Lithuanian PSS (14 Item)
We thank Simona Katauskytė for sharing her translation with our lab. She may be contacted at simona.katauskyte@gmail.com
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

Turkish PSS (14 Item) and preliminary psychometrics data
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. E. Ercument Yerlikaya, University of Cukurova, Turkey. The scale was tested on 246 undergraduate university students. For further information, contact Dr. Yerlikaya at yerlikaya@cu.edu.tr
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

Turkish PSS (10 Item), psychometrics data, and an unpublished manuscript
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Dr. Melek Saygýn, psychiatrist in private practice, who may be contacted at msaygin4@hotmail.com

Russian PSS (14 Item)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Martin Egan on behalf of O.A.T.H. Research, who may be contacted at m_egan@btinternet.com
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Urdu PSS (10 Item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Aneeqa Mariam, Asra Sarwar, Rashida Maqsood, Anum Bashir, and Kiran Aamir, and project supervisor Mamoona Ismail Luna, all of International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan. For questions or to request permission for its use, please contact Aneeqa Mariam at bsp_aneeqa@yahoo.com
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

Urdu PSS (14 Item) .pdf .doc
Translation by (and thanks to) Amna Tahira and Prof. Dr. Rukhsana Kausar (Institute of Applied Psychology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan.). Prof. Dr. Kausar may be contacted at rukhsana.saddul@gmail.com This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

Arabic PSS (10 Item)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Drs. Siraj Wali, Roah Merdad and Rawan Nassif of the Faculty of Medicine at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and Dr. Leena Merdad of the Faculty of Dentistry at King Abdulaziz University.  This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties. Correspondence may be directed to: roahmerdad@gmail.com


COHEN-HOBERMAN INVENTORY of
PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS (CHIPS)

Cohen, S., & Hoberman, H. (1983). Positive events and social supports as buffers of life change stress. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 13, 99-125.


CHIPS
 

CHIPS Scoring

                 LIFE EVENTS CHECKLIST (LEL)

Scoring information

Source article: Cohen, S., Tyrrell, D. A. J., & Smith, A. P. (1991). Psychological stress and susceptibility to the common cold. New England Journal of Medicine, 325, 606-612.

Related articles:
Cohen, S., & Williamson, G. (1991). Stress and infectious disease in humans. Psychological Bulletin,109, 5-24.

Cohen, S., Tyrrell, D. A. J., & Smith, A. P. (1993). Negative life events, perceived stress, negative affect and susceptibility to the common cold. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 64, 131-140.

     
                 SOCIAL NETWORK INDEX (SNI)


Social Network Index
 (SNI; English)
Social Network Index Scoring


Source article: Cohen, S., Doyle, W. J., Skoner, D. P., Rabin, B. S., and Gwaltney, J. M., Jr. (1997). Social ties and susceptibility to the common cold. Journal of the American Medical Association, 277, 1940-1944.

Related articles:
(1.) Bickart, K. C., et al (2011). Amygdala volume and social network size in humans. Nature Neuroscience, 14, 163-164.

(2.) Bickart, K. C., et al (2012). Intrinsic amygdala–cortical functional connectivity predicts social network size in humans. Journal of Neuroscience, 32, 14729-14741.



Portuguese Social Network Index (adapted for individuals with hearing impairments). Translation by (and thanks to) Eunice Costa at ec.nice@gmail.com
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

                 SC RETROSPECTIVE MEASURES
                                 OF CHILDHOOD

SC Childhood Interview (MS Word)

SC Adulthood Interview (MS Word)

Parent Social Participation (PSP) Measure (MS Word)

SC Places You've Lived Interview (MS Word)

PERMISSIONS & USAGE: SC Retrospective Measures of Childhood




INTERPERSONAL SUPPORT
EVALUATION LIST (ISEL)

(links at right and below)


ISEL- General Population version
ISEL-Scoring

ISEL- College student version
ISEL-College scoring
For validity and reliability information on the College student ISEL, click here

Additional scoring and other information for the ISEL


The ISEL was designed to measure perceptions of social support among individuals in the general population. As it is not a diagnostic scale, absolute scores on the ISEL (or its component subscales) have no intrinsic meaning. Accordingly, ISEL item response options are valid whether scaled as 0-3 or 1-4, and relations of ISEL total scores (and subscale scores) to other variables of interest can be interpreted in the same way irrespective of which response scale is used. That said, if making comparisons across 2 or more sets of ISEL data, the investigator should first ensure that all ISEL variables are scaled identically prior to conducting analyses.

PSYCHOMETRICS FOR ISEL
(General Population) & SUBSCALES:
Refer to: Cohen, S., Mermelstein, R., Kamarck, T., & Hoberman, H. (1985). Measuring the functional components of social support. In I. G. Sarason & B. R. Sarason (Eds.), Social support: Theory, research and application (pp. 73-94). The Hague, The Netherlands: Martinus Nijhoff.

NOTE SLIGHT DIFFERENCES IN VERSIONS:
Some of the items in the version linked above differ a little bit from the original published version in terms of wording, but not in terms of the constructs they assess. Accordingly, the scoring is the same as for the original, with the numbers of the reversed items also being the same.

WHEN DATA IS MISSING
: When computing scale (and subscale) scores, we usually require that participants have at least 75% to 85% of the data for that scale. For example, if a scale has 12 items, we require that participants be missing data on no more than 3 items in order to be included in the analysis. When computing the total scale score, we take the mean of all nonmissing items and then multiply by the number of items in the scale. Here is an example using SPSS syntax language:

scale = mean.9(item1, item2, item3,....item10, item11, item12)*12.

Computing the score in this way permits the incorporation of persons with a reasonable amount of missing data, while maintaining the scale's original metric.

ISEL-12 item version

ISEL-12 scoring

Basic psychometrics for ISEL-12 (Word file)




Several investigators have used short versions of the ISEL, including a 16-item and 6-item version. We were not involved in creating these scales, and cannot provide any psychometric information about them. Below are two citations for studies that used a 16-item ISEL version (they used the self-esteem subscale). Unfortunately, none of the articles display actual items, so we can only assume that the two studies below used the same 12 items -- from the appraisal, belonging, and tangible subscales -- that are listed on our website:

          Brummett BH, Babyak MA, Siegler IC, Vitaliano PP, Ballard EL, Gwyther LP, & Williams RB (2006). Associations among perceptions of social support, negative affect, and quality of sleep in caregivers and noncaregivers. Health Psychology, 25(2), 220-225.

          Brummett BH; Babyak MA; Barefoot JC; Bosworth HB; Clapp-Channing NE; Siegler IC; Williams RB Jr; & Mark DB (1998). Social support and hostility as predictors of depressive symptoms in cardiac patients one month after hospitalization: A prospective study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 60(6), 707-713.




And below is a citation for an article that used a 6-item ISEL version, administered in the Cardiovascular Health Study:

          Martire LM; Schulz R; Mittelmark MB; & Newsom JT (1999). Stability and change in older adults' social contact and social support: The Cardiovascular Health Study. Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences., 54B(5), S302-S311.

 

                      
                                     ISEL TRANSLATIONS

How to Acquire Permissions for Translations:
To acquire permission to use a translation in your project, please attempt to contact its translator directly. If unable to contact, please reference their name and this website URL in your publications. Thank you.

ISEL-40 item version (Spanish)

(European Spanish) Translation by Eduardo Remor,
eduardo.remor@uam.es; thanks also to Amy Mayhew,
amymayhew@hotmail.com.
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

ISEL-12 item version (Central & South American Spanish): Abstract of a 2013 article measuring the validity, reliability, psychometric properties of the scale as used on a large sample of Central and South American Spanish speaking participants (self-identified as Dominican, Central American, Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American). Thank you to Dr. Linda Gallo (San Diego State University, USA) for alerting us to this research. Inquiries may be sent to: lgallo@mail.sdsu.edu

ISEL-40 item version (Japanese) (MS Excel file)
Translation by (and thanks to) Naomi Ueyama, Kansai University of Nursing and Health Science, who may be contacted at n.ueyama@kki.ac.jp
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

ISEL-40 item version (Polish)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Danuta Zarzycka, Skubiszewski Medical Uniwersity, who may be e-mailed at danuta.zarzycka@am.lublin.pl
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties, other than those reported by Dr. Zarzycka from a sample of 172 university students:
Reliabilities (Cronbach`s alpha) for the total ISEL: 0.91
Each subscale: Tangible: 0.83; Belonging: 0.84; Appraisal: 0.81; and Self-esteem: 0.71.

ISEL-48 item College student version (Polish)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Danuta Zarzycka, Medical University of Lublin, who may be e-mailed at danuta.zarzycka@am.lublin.pl
Psychometric properties as reported by Dr. Zarzycka from a sample of 167 college students: reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) for the total ISEL 0.88 and for each subscale: tangible 0.54; belonging 0.75, appraisal 0.82, self-esteem 0.69.
For additional information: D. Zarzycka, B.S'pila, I Wron'ska, Makara-Studzin'ska M.: Analiza walidacyjna wybranych aspektów Skali Wsparcia Spoecznego Interpersonal Support Evaluation List 40v. General Population (ISEL-40v.GP). Psychiatria 2010; 7(3):83-94. URL: http://www.psychiatria.viamedica.pl/ (Validation analysis of selected aspects of the scale for the assessment of social support - Interpersonal Support Evaluation List - 40V. General Population (ISEL-40v.GP). Psychiatry 2010; Volume 7, No. 3: 83-94)

ISEL-40 item version (Swedish)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Bruno Hagglof, University of Umeå, who may be contacted at bruno.hagglof@psychiat.umu.se
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

ISEL-40 item version (Danish)
Translation courtesy of (and thanks to) Drs. Rune Andersen and Kate Andreasson, Region Zealand, Psychiatric Research Unit, Denmark. They may be contacted at runan@regionsjaelland.dk and kateandreasson@gmail.com
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

ISEL-40 item version (Dutch)
Translation by (and thanks to) Jo Renty, Ghent University, Belgium, who may be contacted at Jo.Renty@skynet.be   Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory; nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

ISEL-40 item version (Greek)
Translation by (and thanks to) Dr. Marios Adonis, University of Nicosia, Cyprus. Dr. Adonis may be reached at adonis.m@unic.ac.cy
This translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory.

ISEL-College student version (Greek)
Translation by: Ms. Evagelia Delistamatis, Ms. Maria Samakouri, & Dr. Miltos Livaditis. Direct inquiries to Dr. Livaditis at: vpapadop@med.duth.gr
Translation has not been pre-tested by our laboratory, nor are we aware of its psychometric properties.

   PARTNER INTERACTION QUESTIONNAIRE (PIQ)

 


Partner Interaction Questionnaire
The PIQ inquires about the support for quitting provided by a spouse or living partner. For our study, we developed a 20-item version of the PIQ that
included 10 positive and 10 negative behaviors a partner might perform. See the source article, below, for additional details about the scale.

Source: Cohen, S., & Lichtenstein, E. (1990). Partner behaviors that support quitting smoking. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 58, 304-309. PMID: 2365893.

         

 

 Page updated July 25, 2014